a dead man in life

“43,099,200 minutes- the freedom that comes with the realization that death is inevitable”, by Dan Mansutti

i saw a grave of a mother and daughter buried side by side

and the dead woman asked me for a dance, I had to oblige,

she saw the living through my eyes, and touched my life line

.

she had her mouth widened into an unabating smile,

a beaming mien that sculpts her into a haunting device,

she susurrates words of the olden times, her garb contrived

from plant vines, her pearl necklace shriveling, her bones cackling

.

she has lived after death, to nurture the venom of her spite,

her dead dreams are where the worlds collide, the living dies

and the dead is alive, she hands me a note engraved on earth,

she buries me in her grave, and I evanish from her sight

.

into the realm of the living, but still dead when I am alive,

or alive only in death, her voice subsides, I decimate my life line

Anm

.

Image source

Inspired from dVerse Poetics.

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25 thoughts on “a dead man in life

  1. yikes….this started off very welcoming…and I was intrigued by the dance with the dead…and then he whispers became a bit dark…putting you in the coffin…the message engraved in the dirt was a really cool touch as well….nice piece man…good to see you…

    Like

  2. Hello Anmol, happy to see you writing. I thoroughly enjoyed this, as I do like ‘the macabre’. Like the way she called for you, very nice, though sent a few shivers, which was the aim! Smiles. Hope you are well.

    Like

  3. The ending with the dead being alive and the living being in the grave was an eerie touch which gave the poem an eerie touch & took the reader by surprise.

    Like

  4. Goodness this a good write HA ~ I specially love the third stanza:

    the living dies

    and the dead is alive, she hands me a note engraved on earth

    Thanks for linking in and wishing you happy week ~

    Like

  5. jessiemartinovic says:

    beautiful, I was totally struck with relevance especially with the artwork, as it is my friends, what a small world we live in, love and light!

    Like

  6. Hello-

    I like the poem and I’m glad you appear to like my painting as well- It’s themes of the realization of mortality, the futility of fearing death etc…seem to sit well alongside your writing.

    The title of my painting is “43,099,200 minutes- the freedom that comes with the realization that death is inevitable.” Thanks for the link to my blog.

    I’ll be interested to read more of your work…
    cheers, Dan

    http://www.danmansuttiartist.blogspot.com

    Like

  7. Glenn Buttkus says:

    –What they said; & it is nice to bump into you once more out here on the trail; this is so very eerie, surrealist, fatalistic cool; like the
    line /her dead dreams are where the worlds collide/.

    Like

  8. From the beginning, the dance with the dead woman really pulled me in. Haunting yet beautiful. I like the line, “she hands me a note engraved on earth”….wow, of course she did! 🙂

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  9. “she has lived after death, to nurture the venom of her spite,
    her dead dreams are where the worlds collide, the living dies”

    This is brilliantly done and I loved the close too – quite a contrast of living and dead.

    Like

  10. i think grave yards.. and funerals teach us much.. a relief when leaving that some folks do avoid.. all together.. but to be reminded of death and all the possibilities of life.. can truly be..

    a path to and of..

    life…

    Like

  11. Love the dark twist . . . especially love this stanza

    she has lived after death, to nurture the venom of her spite,
    her dead dreams are where the worlds collide, the living dies
    and the dead is alive, she hands me a note engraved on earth,
    she buries me in her grave, and I evanish from her sight

    Like

  12. “into the realm of the living, but still dead when I am alive,”

    Loved this! Amazing imagery throughout the poem, I felt like an eye-witness (thankfully I am not!)

    Like

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